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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 25, 2017, 1:07 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
I don’t know how this issue was resolved but I never heard anything more.
When I motioned the Dutchman that thought he was smart and tried to put a fast one over me I should mention that some years later when I was in a port in the Nederland’s on a Canadian ship during the “Liberation Day” celebrations. The whole crew were treated like princes and wined and dined by the locals who will never forget the Canadian troops that freed them for the occupying German forces.
My last trip we went to Casablanca to load phosphates for Immingham where I was leaving. As this was a port I visited regularly during my sailing days with Gem line I was aware of the customs and had an ample supply of Marlboro cigarettes and Johnny Walker whisky ( which in my opinion used only be used as a cleaning fluid).It is always busy at the loading docks and to anchor waiting your turn. Anchoring off is a very uncomfortable time as there I always a heavy Atlantic swell which makes the ship pitch and roll constantly. There is a large outer breakwater and a large inner area anchorage which you can use if there is space without needing a pilot. I opted for this as we were to wait for a couple of days. That is when the “gifts” were started to be doled out. This I should mention is the recognised procedure in many ports round the world and not do so can lead to many unpleasant encounters with petty officials. Later on when sailing on a Canadian ship the company were very much against this practice and suffered the consequences although they were told what might happen. I chose to ignore this crazy indict as I did not need any extra aggravation in my life. All went well on the passage and I packed ready to depart on arrival when my relief came on board and I had never mention that I would not be coming back. I had a visit from the shore NUS union representative to discuss to crews perceived grievances and really did not care about them so this pompous little man invited me on to the dock to resolve things. I declined as I did not wish that there was any impediment to my getting to Canada. Several years ago when I sailed with a Chinese crew the chief steward who was a Sensei in karate had shown me several moves to defend myself and we had practiced them until he thought I was proficient enough. The only time they were ever used was many years later when I and a couple of crew members had a quick run ashore, during loading in Ashtabula.. Waiting to get a taxi back to the ship when one came and the lady taxi driver was accosted by a gentleman? Rather the worse for the wear (drunk). When I interceded on her behalf he told me to mind my own Fu*king business and took a swing at me. I assume he had never read Sun Tzu “the art of war” you should know your enemy as when he looked up and saw the starry sky and wondered what had happened before he went into an involuntary slumber we get the taxi back to the ship and the lady would not accept our fare. My crew members were rather quiet and never said a word about the incident to me.
On arriving home it was hectic getting all the necessary arrangements done and the transport sorted out courtesy the travel lady in the office in England. Now the realality of what we were doing hit as we had to start saying farewell to friends and one very difficult one was handing over our beloved pet standard poodle to his new owners It nearly broke our hearts but there was no way we could have managed to take him with us. My young daughter was nearly inconsolable and hated the whole thing. My wife and I’s parents were very upset bet could understand the need for us to move on. The British merchant fleet, once the largest in the world was rapidly shrinking due to the outrageous demands of the unions and them going on strike at the slightest pretext and I was not looking into a crystal ball when I saw the day it would be nearly a pale shadow of its former glory.
The moving van took all our belongings away to be shipped in a container Many tears in our eyes we drove away in or rental car. It was our intention to stay in a nice hotel our last night in Edinburgh and drive next day to Prestwick to catch the plane to Toronto. At that time there were no direct flights to Canada from Edinburgh and Glasgow.
We were off to start a new chapter life and still had doubts as to whether we were doing the right thing.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 25, 2017, 6:48 am 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
Wow I am in awe that I have had so much interest in my ramblings but a new chapter is soon to start when I came to Canada as a "Landed Immigrant".
More tales about my adventures and misadventures will start.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 24, 2017, 6:06 pm 
Great stories Cap, please keep them coming!


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 24, 2017, 4:36 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
To continue on my last voyage under the “Red Duster” the nick name for the British merchant navy flag. This as it turned out not to be the case but more about that later.
Our usual trips were to some of the remote places in Norway which are a very scenic country up past the North Cape where it is totally dark in winter and daylight all the time in the summer with the magnificent fiords and snow covered mountains. I always enjoyed the trips there. On one occasion we went with a cargo to one of my old frequent port of call, Odda. I kept the agent informed of our ETA but always signed the message “master” as I wished to surprise him as we had been good friends. When he boarded after we had berthed he said he was not surprised it was me as I was the only captain that approached and docked at the berth that way!! On one trip we went to Bergen where the head office was and we had many visits from staff including the owner Atle Jebsen who wished me good luck in Canada. I called the local brewery up and ordered 50 cases of beer and asked them to be delivered to the ship. What was the name of the ship they asked and were surprised when I told them it was the same as the brewery “Ringnes”? They were pleased to do so and added los of free advertising material.. Near the end of my time we were chartered to load a full cargo of wheat that was to be off loaded from a “Saltie” in Rotterdam for Southampton in England. It was terrible weather out in the Atlantic and also the North Sea and when we arrived at the pilot station it was suspended due to the foul weather but I was told if I wished to enter the Maas River they would assist using their advisory service and plotting me by radar. I had been there many times I opted for that rather than bouncing about outside. Steamed right in and the pilotage advised that the river pilot was not there but I could continue to the berth. Quick consultation to find out where it was as Rotterdam is a massive port and onwards we continued and eventually secured without any mishaps (sometime you have good luck on your side) I presented the NOR to the shipper and he would not accept it as he said the cargo holds were not clean enough. I had half expected this as he was surprised I had managed to get into port as the vessel we were to load from had not arrived. He suggested he come back next day and I said no way come back at 4PM and inspect again. It was only a few pools of water that needed mopping up. Rather a more than a little peeved at this he did come back and had to pass the holds fit to load. I tendered NOR again and he had to accept it and as I had made sure it was before 5PM it counted right away. All these tactics so I would not start time counting for demurrage. The Dutch are very shrewd businessmen and try all sorts of tricks when money is involved. We sat there for three days before the “Saltie’ arrived and I had prepared the mates for what was to be done. Armed with a Polaroid camera they were to be unobtrusive and take photos of the cargo when it was being transferred. I suspected there was some salt water had got into the holds and it shows up as peaks when it is being sucked out. We also got plenty of samples before they caught on what we were doing and banned us from the ship.
On completion of loading the same fellow that had tried to stiff me about accepting the NOR as he knew the ship was delayed, came down to get the Bills of Laden signed was aghast that I would not to sign them and would endorse them. They stated that the cargo was in good condition and I would only sign if I endorsed them with some salt water damaged. The proverbial shi* hat the fan then when I showed him the pictures we had taken and the samples we had to prove it.
Now there was a stalemate and after many phone calls and threats I still would not commit what I might later be involved in a law suit, by signing clean B/L’s. Eventually I was told by the office to sail so we did and arrived in Southampton after passage with smooth seas where the decks never got wet. I instructed the mate not to open the hatches when the shore labour arrived to discharge as I wished to see the receiver first. Big panic now as when the big boss arrived I said as per maritime law I wished to see that he was the rightful owner of the cargo by showing me the B/Ls .Course he could not as they did not exist and he was taken aback when I showed him the pictures we had taken and presented him with the samples. Then we opened the hatches and you could still see the dust covering the cargo so it was a sign that no water had entered the hatches.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 20, 2017, 4:36 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
When I voiced my opinion of their seamanship, or lack their response was we will report you to the “Union” As if I cared and I would have fired the lot of them but there were certain procedures to follow and they were time consuming and extensive and usually resulted in a smack on the wrist and all for naught.
It did not help when I got a new mate and I really felt sorry for him as he had been captain on a liner ship that carried a couple of hundred passengers and to say he was out of his depth would be putting it mildly. He was a great raconteur and could relate to the times when famous people travelled on his ship. He would go to the crew mess to tell them the work to be done and I would go done after a long spell of in activity to find them all sitting back drinking tea encouraging him to tell more tales. He was unfortunate experiencing the demise of passenger ships and to put him on a ship like ship was a dramatic letdown for him. I really felt extremely sorry for him but we were a very different operation and the mate had to be able to load cargo and organise the crew none of which he had long ago lost that ability so I had to let him go as I had enough to do my own job without solving his problems.
We had been accepted as immigrants and to get to Canada within six months of this certificate.
Leave time for me this time was traumatic as there were now we had major decisions to make and thousands arrangements for all the furniture etc that we would take and what to sell including all the electrical appliances etc. These onerous tasks alas fell on my wife as I had to go back to sailing. We had also to sell our car which a few moths previously the salesman assured me we were buying a fabulous vehicle of outstanding value and was now a heap of junk!!
I had to make that terrible call to the office telling them I would be leaving. They asked me to visit the office to discuss things and I was not looking forward to that. The visit was very cordial and they asked me if I was certain this was the step I wanted to take. I was offered a year’s leave of absence should things not work out, return with full rank and seniority. In the office there was a lady who made all the travel arrangements for the crew and she offered to get me Seaman’s rate on our air line ticket which was a big saving and included extra baggage allowance.. They want me to do another three months stint which I agreed to as I said before they were the best sipping company I sailed for


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 17, 2017, 6:18 am 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
I managed to arrange to medicals and x-rays for the family ( at some considerable costs) and as we were all declared fit and free from TB an interview would be arranged with the Canadian Consulate in Glasgow. This was conducted in a very short time and all sorts of questions were asked. I don’t remember much about it as the person conducting the interview was from Quebec and this was the first indication that there could be some difficulties with this down the line. However we were told the results would be sent to us in due course.
Shortly there after I joined one of the mini bulkers and learnt about their workings. They only had two cargo holds and no derricks or cranes. Everything was fitted to make operations easy with all the latest labour saving gadgets and electronics. To clean the cargo holds there were two high pressure water guns at each end of the holds which were wound down and set to what action you wanted, from complete hold or only certain parts. (They have similar systems for cleaning tanks on tankers.) Then there were large blowers to send fresh air to dry them out. Only labour that the crew were required to do was mop up any puddles and pick up any large object that would not go through the screens in the bilge.
After two months then quick vacation then I had to join my ship in Rotterdam. She had been there for paint job and engine overhaul. One of the parts removed for overhaul was the main engine governor and who ever had worked on that did not do it right as when we were ready to leave I was only to shift to a layby berth for the finalization and the sail to Cork in Ireland to load for Newark in New York. So much for my hopes of short voyages etc.
Cast off the lines and the first engine movement I gave on the bridge controls was dead slow ahead. What happened was that the engine went to full ahead and I had to punch the emergency stop and stop the ship crashing into another ship. Was my heart pressure at above average??. I realised that there were some problems as like most of the workers in the UK were very militant and were very union oriented. Every time the mate wanted them to do a job the response was “It’s not my job” This was alien to me and very much against my upbringing. This was the days before Margret Thatcher and in my mind was the right person to sort these petty dictators out.
We went to Cork and loaded a mineral for Newark and during the voyage got the Mate to have the sailors replace the mooring wires. They could hardly say that was not their job. For those not seamen I should explain that the wire came in a big coil and there were only two ways to uncoil it without causing massive kinks and tangles. The easiest and smartest was to hang it on a turntable made of crossing stout planks and drilling a hole in the centre, then pass a wire through the centre and hang it on a swivel hook. When it is lifted clear of the deck one end, from the outside is pulled and as the coil turns pull it along the deck and flake it out. There are other ways but I won’t go into that. It did not surprise me that they made a real mess of it with the coil of wire ending up a massive tangled mess.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 16, 2017, 3:10 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
Shortly there after I joined one of the mini bulkers and learnt about their workings. They only had two cargo holds and no derricks or cranes. Everything was fitted to make operations easy with all the latest labour saving gadgets and electronics. To clean the cargo holds there were two high pressure water guns at each end of the holds which were wound done and set to what action you wanted, from complete hold or only certain parts. (They have similar systems for cleaning tanks on tankers.) Then there were large blowers to send fresh air to dry them out. Only labour that the crew were required to do was mop up ad puddles and pick up any large object that would not go through the screens in the bilge.
After two months then quick vacation then I had to join my ship in Rotterdam. She had been there for paint job and engine overhaul. One of the parts removed for overhaul was the main engine governor and who ever had worked on that did not do it right as when we were ready to leave I was only to shift to a layby berth for the finalization and the sail to Cork in Ireland to load for Newark in New York. So much for my hopes of short voyages etc.
Cast off the lines and the first engine movement I gave on the bridge controls was ded slow ahead. What happened was that the engine went to full ahead and I had to punch the emergency stop and stop the ship crashing into another ship. Was my heart pressure at above average??. I realised that there were some problems as like most of the workers in the UK were very militant and were very union oriented. Every time the mate wanted them to do a job the response was “It’s not my job” This was alien to me and very much against my upbringing. This was the days before Margret Thatcher and in my mind was the right person to sort these petty dictators out.
We went to cork and loaded a mineral for Newark and during the voyage got the Mate to have the sailors replace the mooring wires. They could hardly say that was not there job. For not seamen I should explain that the wire came in a big coil and there were only two ways to uncoil it without causing massive kinks and tangles. The easiest and smartest was to hang it on a turntable made of crossing stout planks and drilling a hole in the centre, then pass a wire through the centre and hang it on a swivel hook. When it is lifted clear of the deck one end, from the outside is pulled ands as the coil turns pull it along the deck and flake it out. There are other ways but I won’t go into that. It did not surprise me that they made a real mess of it with the coil of wire ending up a massive tangled mess.
More to follow


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 13, 2017, 4:45 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
When I arrived in New Orleans it was the month of August and a long time mystery was solved. In many of the movies made in the US, especially about the South, there was a noise in the back ground that I did not know what it was and there I found out. It was crickets chipping away. Where I lived in Scotland we don’t have them so when we heard them we had no idea what was causing that entire racket!! Know now as I have it where I live in rural Ontario there are times it drives you crazy, especially when one gets down the basement!
Problems were easily solved and after a shot passage to the Panama Canal I flew home ready to start another adventure. Here was also a letter from Immigration Canada to informing me that the family had to have an x-ray done ad a physical done by a doctor they would nominate


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 12, 2017, 9:43 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
I had requested that I sail on their mini bulkers which were about 6000 tons deadweight and did not go far (I thought).The wheelhouse was 360 degree visibility and all the controls were there as it had an unmanned engine room. There were two engineers on board but they and the oiler were on day work and at the end of the day the alarm system was switched on to the wheelhouse and whichever engineer was on duty.
There was a display board like an aircraft in the wheel house which told you what was happening all over the ship as well as a fire detection panel.
Before I was supposed to go on one as a learner to office called and said there had been some problems on my last ship so would I fly to New Orleans and help out and I would be relieved in the Panama Canal. I flew to New York and because the plane was late I arrived too late to catch the connection. I was put up in a hotel and due to many late flights was lucky to get a room. I was so tired by this time I went right to bed and although it was air conditioned found it uncomfortable and warm.
I was up early next morning and we I drew the curtains - there was no glass and there were stains on the floor and walls. When I was checking out the manager was horrified that I was in that room as homicide had occurred in it and it was not supposed to have been rented. I just wanted away and got the flight to New Orleans.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 10, 2017, 12:33 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
All good things have to end and it was back to sailing and it was on the most problem ship I sailed on. Her history was one disaster after another and II joined in Hamburg where the latest had been repaired. I won’ tell much of this ill fated ship but touch briefly on her and the woes that we endured.
Once the dockyard had finished their work we sailed for Porsgrund in Norway to load fertilizer for Wilmington in US. As we were approaching ice was encountered and I called the engine room to tell them we were entering an ice field. I thought they would then switch the engine cooling water to the lower suction but they were new and did not appreciate what would happen. Sure enough frantic calls from the E/R they had to slow down as the cooling water intake were plugged with ice!!!.
A quick load and off we set to the US and the weather was very bad the ne gale after another. The poor engineers had my sympathy as this was a twin engine ship and one engine after another seemed to need some repair requiring us to go only one engine. Seldom were the two working at the same time. With the bad weather I requested the captain to heave to so we could look round and see that all was OK on deck. He was frightened to and one time the weather eased off I went on deck to see that one of the derrick supports had bent and knocked the top of a hatch vent. Result of that was water had got into the hold.
We fixed that best we could but when we went to the forecastle stores and opened the door a wave of water, paint and old rope and wires me us. The place was flooded and we soon saw why. The port anchor had slipped its turn buckle and securing and the slight amount of movement in the constant wave was enough to crack the hawse pipe allowing seas to enter every time the bow dipped under the waves. Not much we could do but we hammered wooden wedges in the crack after heaving tight the anchor. The clean up could wait.
Surprisingly there was not a great deal of sea water damage but at the lower part of the hold it had solidified and pay loaders had to be used to break it up and cart it away to a toxic fill landfill. The shipyard at Tama our next port and came and made a template of the cracked hawse pipe that would be fitted there when we were loading.
At Tampa we were to load a full cargo of waste paper in bales for Durban in SA. We loaded using the ships equipment which was Welle derricks that were using hydraulic winches. This equipment was designed by a person that had no concept of what to do if a wire requires replacing. Not too bad if the wire only needed replacing if worn but if t broke it was a nightmare. Reading the instructions was like it was a direct translation from Chinese to Greek and then English. This was also the problems with the main engines as one had to be run o power the extra generator required for the hydraulic pumps. No wonder the engines were requiring constant work to keep them operational!
A constant watch had to b keep for oil leaks from the hydraulics as the US Coast Guard would fine us for pollution. This was a never ending task and I felt sorry for the engineers who had this to contend with was well as all else. Hardly surprising they were not happy campers.!!
We eventually got loaded and with the usual engine problems finally arrived at Durban when we were in for a big shock. This was during the terrible period of apartheid and the Afrikaners guards were over the place. He shit hit the fan when a sling of these waste paper bales fell and burst open and the contents consisted of Playboy, Penthouse etc magazines. These were scooped up by the black labourers and then the thugs in uniform descended with batons swinging. Unlading was stopped immediately. Guards were posted.
We did eventually get rid of the cargo and move to the Bluff to load several parcels of various ores. During this period the captain asked me if I would be doing another trip. My reply was no way and the sooner I got of this ship the better. Two days late he told m to pack my bags as a relief was on his way. I flew home from Durban via Johannesburg and Zurich on a Swiss Air DC10 and on to home. The office called me to come down for a chat.
I told them what had been going on and there was no way I was putting up any longer with a captain whose favorite lunch was a bottle of Gordons.
I went on leave and when the ship arrived at Antwerp one of the directors was waiting its docking..
Walked on board unannounced and found the Captain drunk as to be unable to function. He was immediately replaced. I was invited tio Bergen to meet the people in the main office and the owner Attle Jebsen.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 7, 2017, 6:29 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
Just a short story about my time with Palm Line.
The time I was there was the start of the independence movement when the British colonies were becoming separate countries.
One of the things was that they all wanted their own currency and coinage as before it was common to them all "British West Africa" notes and coins.
What happened to the notes I don't know but the coins were collected and were to be shipped back to the UK and smelted down.
It was called "specie" and one time we were to take a few tonnes of them.
They were packed in small jute bags and four of them were put into flimsy plywood boxes. If memory serves me each bag contained 100 pounds.
Loading them in nets and a few were accidently dropped with a result there were British West Africia shillings etc. scattered all over the place.
We just swept them up and shovelled them into repaired (after a fashion) boxes. They were still legal tender in some places.
We had a Nigerian crew and some of them were very diligent in collecting them but not putting them where they were supposed to go but in their pockets.
It was only when we got to Liverpool and one of the crew ordered a suit at Burtons and tried to pay for it with these coins did we appreciate how hard working they had been sweeping those specie up.
He was charged but goodness knows how many boxes were light at the destination!!


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 7, 2017, 6:28 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
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Another of my recollections of my days in Palm Line.
We were discharging in Accra which was a surf port and it was one of the mates on deck to initial a talley slip if a piece of cargo was lost over board. (LOB).
One trip I was dismayed to discover that my left elbow was swelling up and was to say the least dis-comfortable.
It was decided that I should go ashore to see a doctor.
Only way to do that was by surfboat.
I was given a slip to say that I was cargo so the crew of the boat could be paid for that trip. I was not going to be the only cargo as the boat was loaded as well so I was perched on top of the cargo.
Off we set with the boss man in the stern keeping time on a little bell thing that kept the rhythm of the paddlers.
As the beach was approaching he stopped and all paddling ceased.
Next thing was he was tinging that thing at double pace and the paddlers were doing their thing keeping time.
All of a sudden as the surf was boiling round us he stopped and the paddlers jumped into the water and pushed the boat as far up the beach as possible..
When it grounded a couple of them hoisted me on their shoulders and carried me to dry land.
I went up to see the doctor who looked at my elbow and said I will fix that laddie (he was a fellow Scot).
Froze it with either and got a scalpel and lanced it. A good squeeze and out popped lots of little maggots. Seems that there is a type of fly that lands on you and lays its eggs under the skin where they hatch using you as their food. It healed up with the aid of some type of cream.
The trip back out to the ship was non eventful as there was no cargo other than I and I sat on the thwarts when they pushed the boat into the surf as it was riding high.

Please forgive me if these stories are duplicates.


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 7, 2017, 6:01 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
Posts: 286
Another of my tales about the time I spent with Palm Line.
It was on board Ashanti Palm that this occurred.
We had loaded in Liverpool for the "coast" and during that time carpenters had built magazines in #4 tween deck and #1 ween deck.
We proceeded round to Milford Haven and anchored.
ICI had a small ship that carried only explosives and other stuff that went bang.
In #4 hatch we loaded in one of the magazines, black powder (gun powder) which was in small plywood boxes about 1 foot square. In these boxes were four cotton bags of gunpowder. In #1 hatch there were detonators etc. We also had munitions for the Ghanaian army.
During discharge in Takoradi these small boxes were being thrown about with no regard to there careful handling resulting in a few being broken and the contents split. To make matters worse some to the gang were sneaking a smoke.
I just about went ballistic and stopped all the unloading. Called all the gang to come with me and took a handful of the powder up to the forecastle and put it on the mooring bits.
I was to demonstrate what happens when cigarettes and gunpowder come in contact.
Puffed my own cigarette and touched it to the powder. Nothing happened. I then lent closer and took a few deep puffs to get a good glow on the cigarette. Touched it to the powder and a big flash.
When I recovered my vision I looked round and the gang were in stitches with laughter. I had become the same colour as they and had no eyebrows or eye lashes. I was not amazed and went to my cabin to shower and change telling the gang to get back to unloading and no more cigarettes.
When I went back on deck a short while later I was approached by a very polite young man. He told me he had been delegated buy the other gangs to ask me if I could show them the trick with the gunpowder as they had heard that it was an amazing trick and they wished to see it for themselves. My response is not printable!!!


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 7, 2017, 5:59 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
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I have written a couple of stories about my time with Gem line so I thought that I should relate a story about my Palm Line days.
Hopeful;ly I won't offend anyone as these happened a long time ago.
I was second mate and as such I was supposed to be in charge of the wellbeing of the labour we embarked at Freetown. Kru (or Kroo) boys as they were known by.
Each morning we had a sick parade and the minor ailments I could treat with the help of that famous tome "Ship masters Medical Guide" . If it was serious they were sent to a doctor ashore.
There was an occasion that one very large gentleman approached and told me that "massa I no go kaka for three days" I didn't need to consult the reference book and issued four cascara tablets. "You no go kaka come see me tomorrow"
Next day he presented himself." Massa I no go kaka for four days"
Black draft will solve that I thought so a liberal quantaty was dispensed.
"You no go kaka come see me tomorrow"
I was very surprised when next day he was there. "Massa I no go kaka for five days"
I was getting desperate and mixed up some black draft, Epsom's salts and cascara tablets and gave them to him.
Was I flabbergasted when next day he was there but with a different story. "Massa I no go kaka but piss through assh*le"


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 Post subject: Re: My starting to be a sailor
Unread postPosted: June 5, 2017, 9:40 pm 

Joined: July 19, 2010, 4:51 pm
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We at least got a night in port as discharge usually finished about ten P.M. and only sailed during daylight. The town had been an American base too and when the pulled out lt the instructive. There were plenty of bars to enjoy but I was usually too tired to test their hospitality.
Sailed back to Goose Bay and repeated he whole operation ad nausea
When it started to get really cold and the ice started to form we were told that the whole operation was closing and in late October we loaded the last of the pulpwood and them all he major equipment and Trailers of supplies to take to Stephenville. I must admit that Goose Bay and Stephenville along with Nauru are places I did not care to visit again completion we went to Bathurst and load zinc concentrate for Antwerp and it was a miserable crossing as the vessel was very stiff and we rolled like crazy till we got t the English Channel.’
Discharge in Antwerp was speedy and then round to Rotterdam to load steel and change crew. It was vacation time for me and I was pleased that I was able to celebrate it with my Family.
Immigration Canada was requesting a pile of information. Financial position, certified copies of my qualifications and who were my parents and grandparents etc


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