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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 24, 2021, 4:26 pm 
The entire reason for the Mark W. Barker's construction is a contract Interlake Steamship has with Cargill to move salt for them. And while the haulage of salt will cause corrosion, the Mark W. Barker is being built to do so from the outset, and not late in her career as most ships do. Except for Algoma, whose newest ships haul salt - and they've done that since the early 1970s.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 24, 2021, 1:50 pm 

Joined: December 14, 2017, 8:37 pm
Posts: 740
GuestfromEU wrote:
Guest wrote:
This makes me wonder of the durability of the New Mark Barker. We have seen many a ship employed in the salt trade become corroded way too early in life. Hopefully this won't happen to her.


With modern coatings in the tunnel and cargo hold, corrosion will be reduced. Any ship is a tool designed for a purpose. Being a Jones Act ship the construction costs are higher, but the depreciation is structured accordingly from finance perspective. With new technology introduced and environmental regulations consistently mandating greater efficiency, ships will not be built to last more than 30 years in any event.


The 3 river class boats built by AmShip, Roesch/Thayer/Wolverine were said to be 30 yr boats and as cheaply as they were built and considering the varieties of cargoes they have carried, they continue on nearing 50 yrs of service


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 24, 2021, 12:47 pm 
I'm quite sure that Interlake envisions running this ship for far longer than 30 years. The engine room can always modernized via repowering during a mid-life refit, the equipment on the bridge can be modernized, etc. A ship isn't a static thing and can be updated as technology advances and environmental regulations evolve.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 24, 2021, 9:54 am 

Joined: December 7, 2014, 10:33 am
Posts: 326
Guest wrote:
This makes me wonder of the durability of the New Mark Barker. We have seen many a ship employed in the salt trade become corroded way too early in life. Hopefully this won't happen to her.


With modern coatings in the tunnel and cargo hold, corrosion will be reduced. Any ship is a tool designed for a purpose. Being a Jones Act ship the construction costs are higher, but the depreciation is structured accordingly from finance perspective. With new technology introduced and environmental regulations consistently mandating greater efficiency, ships will not be built to last more than 30 years in any event.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 23, 2021, 10:05 am 
Guest wrote:
The Mark W. Barker is designed with a large cubic capacity (box shaped hold) and MacGregor hatchcovers not just for the salt trade she will primarily be employed in, and other bulk cargoes such as iron ore, but to also carry oversized cargo such as machinery, windmill parts as the opportunity arises. The traditional hatch-cover sizes used for decades on the lakes wouldn't allow this.


This makes me wonder of the durability of the New Mark Barker. We have seen many a ship employed in the salt trade become corroded way too early in life. Hopefully this won't happen to her.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 20, 2021, 7:11 pm 
The Mark W. Barker is designed with a large cubic capacity (box shaped hold) and MacGregor hatchcovers not just for the salt trade she will primarily be employed in, and other bulk cargoes such as iron ore, but to also carry oversized cargo such as machinery, windmill parts as the opportunity arises. The traditional hatch-cover sizes used for decades on the lakes wouldn't allow this.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 20, 2021, 7:09 am 
Here's the Link to Macgregor's Brochure

https://www.macgregor.com/globalassets/ . /31032.pdf

Tom


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 Post subject: Re: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 20, 2021, 6:17 am 

Joined: December 6, 2014, 3:43 pm
Posts: 1094
They are Macgregor brand hatch covers. They make about 10 different types of hatch covers, but I believe these are stacking covers. They stack on top of each other, either in pairs for each hatch (ie piggyback covers), or perhaps in a larger stack of up to about 6 covers (stacking covers). They are also strong enough that cargo can be carried on top of the hatch covers.

I assume folding covers were not used since they would interfere with the unloading boom.

Here is a video showing general types of hatch covers currently used on ocean going ships, including piggyback and stacking (at 8:50 timestamp). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6ZY6ym3zz0

And here is a 2020 video of the Mark W Barker with seven of the 10 covers installed on the partially- built hull: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8ENSyf2Ys8


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 Post subject: Mark w barker
Unread postPosted: October 19, 2021, 10:51 pm 
What kind of hatch covers are they putting on the Barker? They look large and similar to ones I’ve seen on foreign ships where they are hinged in the middle and fold upwards to expose the cargo hold. They don’t appear to be the traditional style that most of the lakers have. Any info is appreciated. Tia


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